Purple flower in watercolour and technical pen on terraskin. 
A bit of an experiment. I was told that terraskin was good for watercolour, but hadn’t tried it yet. It will take some getting used to, as it doesn’t absorb the water or paint the way rag papers do. It is also ridiculously easy to lift paint after it’s dried, and not so easy to blend. Fantastic with masking fluid, though. 
Line drawing here.

Purple flower in watercolour and technical pen on terraskin. 

A bit of an experiment. I was told that terraskin was good for watercolour, but hadn’t tried it yet. It will take some getting used to, as it doesn’t absorb the water or paint the way rag papers do. It is also ridiculously easy to lift paint after it’s dried, and not so easy to blend. Fantastic with masking fluid, though. 

Line drawing here.

Flowers in technical pen on terraskin. Line drawing. Unknown species. 

Flowers in technical pen on terraskin. Line drawing. Unknown species. 

Boxes in perspective

My mom asked me how to draw boxes in perspective, so I put together these little animations and reference images for her. It occurred to me that it might be helpful to others.

One-point perspective:

image

At different angles:

image

Two-point perspective:

image

At different angles:

image

Alstroemeria in watercolour and technical pen on Arches hot press.

Alstroemeria, technical pens #00, 2 on 100% rag marker paper. 

Taking advantage of live flowers to practice my pen work. My blog might be filled with variations on this theme for the next little while.

Alstroemeria in watercolour and pen on Arches hot press watercolour board. 

Some flower drawing/watercolour practice on my birthday flowers. I think I identified them correctly, but I’m not trained in botany, so I might be wrong.

Cyclamen in watercolour.

The is the second of the botanical paintings done with Michael Spillane at the Guelph School of Art. Once again, it is a copy of one of his works, so the original drawing is not mine, and the method of painting was done according to his instruction, with a little bit of interpretation on my part. 

The first piece, Zinnia in watercolour, is here.

Zinnia in watercolour. 

This is the first of two botanical paintings done in a two-weekend workshop at the Guelph School of Art with Michael Spillane. It’s a copy of one of his pieces, so the original drawing isn’t mine, and the painting was done according to his method. It’s a bit time-consuming, but I really like how controlled it is.  

His original piece is here: Zinnia in watercolour by Michael Spillane

I will post the second painting soon.

Two-headed calf! My submission for the Brain Scoop t-shirt contest

Done in Illustrator. Lots of fun!

Some red-eyed tree frog studies for a project I’m working on. Trying out watercolour with different types of pen/ink.